A Seed Is Sleepy



Last updated Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Author: Dianna Hutts Aston
Illustrator: Sylvia Long
Date of Publication: 2007
ISBN: 0811855201
Grade Level: 2nd    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Apr. 2018

Synopsis: Award-winning artist Sylvia Long and author Dianna Hutts Aston have teamed up again to create this gorgeous and informative introduction to seeds. Poetic in voice and elegant in design, the book introduces children to a fascinating array of seed and plant facts, making it a guide that is equally at home being read on a parent's lap as in a classroom reading circle.

Note to readers:
•  Lots of beautiful pictures in this book, do a picture walk-through

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Do any of you have a garden that you grow vegetables or flowers in? What about a relative?
•  If you had the space, would you start one? Even if it's only in pots?
•  What would you grow in a garden?

Vocabulary

•  Seed: a small part of the flower that grows into a new plant
•  Gymnosperms: naked seeds, not in fruits
•  Texture: the feel or look of a surface
•  Ancient: very old

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  Compare drawings of seeds in pages before to the fruits on the page. What fruits have you eaten?
•  Redwoods are some of the tallest and oldest trees on Earth. Some are more than 2000 years old. Have you been to the redwood forest in Northern California?
•  Look at the comparison of seed growth on "a seed is generous" and talk about how long it takes for each to "mature".

Craft ideas:
•  Draw a picture of your favorite flower, fruit, vegetable, or other plant.
•  Hand print cacti or flowers (see Pinterest) (Trace hands then color)
•  Draw a picture of a "pretend" plant or flower. Be as silly, crazy, and colorful as you like.
•  Check our craft ideas on Pinterest!
https://www.pinterest.com/readingtokids/april-2018-animal-crafts/

Special activities:
•  What seed would they be and why? (Japanese maple seed = Adventurous)

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!