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Once Upon a Weasel



Last updated Sunday, January 7, 2018

Author: Salvo Lavis and James Munn
Illustrator: Dave Leonard
Date of Publication: 2016
ISBN: 0997798203
Grade Level: 1st    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Jan. 2018

Synopsis: This is the story of a boy whose imagination runs wild when he adopts an unconventional pet that sparks his imagination and helps bring his space travel fantasies to life. Back on planet Earth, problems arise when the weasel escapes during a class field trip and turns an entire science museum upside down. In trouble with his parents, the boy must figure out how to make things right-and how to keep pet he loves.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Have you ever seen a pet weasel?
•  Do you have any pets at home?

Vocabulary

•  Rambunctious - wildly or uncontrollably active; difficult to control; boisterous.
•  Planetarium - a device that projects images of the sun, moon, stars, and planets on a ceiling that is shaped like a dome.
•  Supernovas - a rare and very bright object that results from the explosion of a star.
•  Pandemonium - wild, tumultuous uproar; noisy chaos.

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  What other kinds of pets do you see in the pet shop in the book?
•  Do you think the weasel was a good pet?
•  What type of adventures does the kid imagine having at the planetarium?
•  Where was the weasel hiding in the museum?
•  Do you have any chores or responsibilities at home?

Craft ideas:
•  Color in the "Rocket Plans" coloring sheet.
•  Draw or create a rocket out a construction paper and blast it off.
•  Draw the moon and your favorite planet and stars.
•  Check our January craft ideas on Pinterest!
https://www.pinterest.com/readingtokids/january-2018-mysteries-adventure-craft-ideas/

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!