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Creepy Carrots!



Last updated Monday, October 6, 2014

Author: Aaron Reynolds
Illustrator: Peter Brown
Date of Publication: 2012
ISBN: 1442402970
Grade Level: 2nd    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Oct. 2014

Synopsis: In this Caldecott Honor-winning picture book, The Twilight Zone comes to the carrot patch as a rabbit fears his favorite treats are out to get him.

Jasper Rabbit loves carrots—especially Crackenhopper Field carrots. He eats them on the way to school. He eats them going to Little League. He eats them walking home. Until the day the carrots start following him...or are they?

Celebrated artist Peter Brown’s stylish illustrations pair perfectly with Aaron Reynold’s text in this hilarious picture book that shows it’s all fun and games…until you get too greedy.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Why do you think the carrots in this story are creepy?
•  Who thinks the carrots are creepy? Why?

Vocabulary:
•  passion - a strong liking
•  hare - a type of rabbit
•  sinister - threatening evil, harm, or danger
•  ridiculous - absurd, preposterous, or silly
•  hatched a plan - to create or decide on a plan, especially a secret plan

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  When did Jasper first notice something strange? (A: After the big game against the East Valley Hares.)
•  Where did Jasper see creepy carrots?
•  Did Jasper's mom and dad see creepy carrots? What did his mom say about creepy carrots?
•  What was Jasper's plan to keep the creepy carrots from getting out of Crackenhopper Field?
•  Why were the carrots happy that Jasper had carried out his plan?

Craft ideas:
•  Make your own creepy carrots. Use construction paper for the carrot, ribbon for its top, and glue on googly eyes.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!