Volunteers needed in October!   Click here to sign up.
 Site Areas: 
  HOME  
  ABOUT US  
  FRIENDS & SUPPORTERS  
  HOW TO HELP  
  NEWS  
  READING CLUBS  
Printer-friendly version   

Paddle-to-the-Sea



Last updated Monday, January 7, 2013

Author: Holling C. Holling
Date of Publication: 1941
ISBN: 0395150825
Grade Level: 4th    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Jan. 2013

Synopsis: Amazon.com Review
A young Indian boy carves a little canoe with a figure inside and names him Paddle-to-the-Sea. Paddle's journey, in text and pictures, through the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean provides an excellent geographic and historical picture of the region.

Note to readers:
•  The author does a great job at painting very visual pictures throughout the book. Encourage your students to picture these scenes as they listen to the story
•  While reading, point out on a map the various locations Paddle visits

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Does anyone know where the largest lake in the world is?
•  Has anyone ever been in a canoe?

Vocabulary:
•  Arbutus- a genus (group of species) of broad-leaved evergreen trees or shrubs
•  Plunge- fall or throw oneself into a substance or place
•  Crest- the highest or culminating point; the peak
•  Buffeted- strike, batter, or blow repeatedly
•  Nipigon- the largest lake entirely within the boundaries of the Canadian province of Ontario

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  Show students the map in the back of the book and then show them a current map to demonstrate how this map has changed. Ask students why the map has changed.
•  If you could send something down the river what would you want it to see? Where would you want it to end up?

Craft ideas:
•  Create a picture of your favorite places that Paddle visited.
•  Make your own canoe out of construction paper
•  Create your own object to send down the river
•  Write a message to put in a bottle and send out to sea.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!