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Scarecrow Finds a Friend



Last updated Friday, September 26, 2008

Author: Blume Rifken
Date of Publication: 2008
ISBN: 0979694809
Grade Level: 2nd    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Oct. 2008

Synopsis: Amazon.com
This heartening tale involves Tally, a good witch, who is losing her power to fly. She befriends a Scarecrow and he comes up with a plan to save her flying power. Together they are able to get back Tally's flying power, express their gratitude to each other, and give young readers a few surprises along the way. The story illustrates to children how comforting and rewarding a good friendship can be as well as how much fun it is to solve a problem with the help of someone who cares about them.

Note to readers:
•  Vocabulary Fearful, jabbering, condition, pesky, whisked, teetered, jolted

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Have you ever seen a scarecrow?
•  What does a scarecrow do?
•  Have you ever shooed birds away?
•  Have you seen leaves turn colors and fall from trees?

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  During:
•  Do you believe in witches?
•  What is a wishbone?
•  Have you ever pulled a wishbone? After:
•  Have you ever had a wish come true?
•  If you had one wish, what would it be?

Craft ideas:
•  Make a paper chain. Cut out long strips of paper about 8 inches wide. Fold the paper backward and forward in a square shape to make an accordian effect. Draw a halloween character (ghost, witch etc.) on the surface (make sure the edge of the charcter runs goes all the way to the edge of the paper.) Cut the character leaving a part of the folded edges of each side uncut so that the characters are holding hands when you pull the paper apart.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!