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The Talking Eggs



Last updated Friday, July 20, 2007

Author: Robert San Souci
Illustrator: Jerry Pinkney
Date of Publication: 1989
ISBN: 0803706197
Grade Level: 3rd    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Sep. 2005

Synopsis: A Southern folktale in which kind Blanche, following the instructions of an old witch, gains riches, while her greedy sister makes fun of the old woman and is duly rewarded.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  What do you think the book is about?
•  Why do you think the book is called ?The Talking Eggs??
•  Does anybody remember reading Mufaro?s Beautiful Daughters last month? What was it about?
•  Does anyone know the story of Cinderella?

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  Describe how Rose and the widow are the same. How are they different from Blanche?
•  What promises does Blanche make to the old woman?
•  What strange things does Blanche see at the old woman?s place? How would you have reacted?
•  What types of treasures come out of the plain eggs?
•  What wicked plan does Rose and her mom make?
•  How is Rose?s reactions to the old woman?s place different than Blanche?s? What would you have done?
•  What comes out of the jeweled eggs?
•  What happens to Rose, her mom, and Blanche in the end?
•  What lessons do you learn from this story?

Craft ideas:
•  Make a decorative string of both plain and fancy paper eggs. Write your wishes on the back of them. Bring ahead option: string, glitter glue, and sequins.
•  Draw something unusual that you might see at the old woman?s house.
•  Pretend you are Blanche and make a thank you card for the old woman.

Special activities:
•  Teach the students how to do a Virginia reel, square dance, or cakewalk. Bring ahead option: music for one of the dances.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!