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We All Went on Safari



Last updated Monday, September 16, 2019

Author: Laurie Krebs
Illustrator: Julia Cairns
Date of Publication: 2003
ISBN: 1841484784
Grade Level: 1st    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Jun. 2004

Synopsis: A lively group of Maasai children takes readers on a trek across the grasslands of Tanzania in a counting book that doubles as an introduction to this culture.

Note to readers:
•  *note to readers: make sure to practice the pronunciations of the numbers/other words.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Have everyone count to 10 in English, Spanish, and any other languages anyone knows.
•  What is a safari?
•  By looking at the cover, where do you think this story takes place? What are your clues?

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  Look at the discussion items at the back of the book, and talk about them. What?s different or special about the animals of Tanzania, other animals?
•  Can you name some of the animals from the story? (If you need help, go page by page as a reminder). Read about the animals in the back of the book.

Craft ideas:
•  Take a sheet of paper, and cut window flaps. Glue to a separate sheet of paper. On the top of each flap, write a number 1- 10; behind each window flap draw the animal, and write the Swahili words.
•  Look at the back of the book and pick a name you like. Make a headband, necklace, mask or shield with "your" Maasai name. Decorate it. Present to the class and explain why you chose that name.
•  Make number flash cards with the number on the front and the Swahili word on the back.

Special activities:
•  Shout out the Swahili names for animals, and have them act out the animal.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!