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Stick Dog



Last updated Monday, July 7, 2014

Author: Tom Watson
Date of Publication: 2013
ISBN: 0062110780
Grade Level: 4th    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Jul. 2014

Synopsis: Introducing everyone's new best friend: Stick Dog! He'll make you laugh . . . he'll make you cry . . . but above all, he'll make you hungry. Follow Stick Dog as he goes on an epic quest for the perfect burger. With hilarious stick-figure drawings, this book has a unique perspective, as the author speaks directly to the reader throughout the story in an engaging and lively way.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Have you ever wanted something so badly that you were willing to do almost anything to get it?
•  What is the most important thing to you? Why?

Vocabulary:
•  superior - something that has a higher rank, quality, or importance
•  breed - a specific kind or group of animals
•  suburb - a town where people live in houses near a larger city
•  distinct - when something is clearly real and different from each other
•  conniving - to be sneaky, secretive

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  Why do you think Tom wants you to make agreements with him?
•  What agreements does Tom want you to make?
•  Why is Stick Dog content with living in the pipe?
•  Describe Stick Dog's personality. How is he different from his friends?

Craft ideas:
•  Write your own story with drawings. When writing your story, give your character a goal to work toward, and at least one obstacle that get in his/her way. (notebook paper provided)
•  Story switch. Draw a series of four pictures. The pictures should tell a story without using any words. Exchange your pictures with another classmate, and write a story to accompany their drawings.
•  Draw a maze of Stick Dog's journey to the hamburgers.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!