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Nothing Ever Happens On 90th Street



Last updated Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Author: Roni Schotter
Date of Publication:
ISBN: 0613228030
Grade Level: 3rd    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Jul. 2013

Synopsis: When Eva sits on her stoop trying to complete a school assignment by writing about what happens in her neighborhood, she gets a great deal of advice and action. (Amazon.com)

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Where do you think this story takes place?
•  Does it look like anything is really happening on 90th Street?

Vocabulary:
•  embarked - set out on a venture
•  promenade - a leisurely walk, especially one taken in a public place as a social activity
•  mid-plie - a ballet movement in which the knees are bent while the back is held straight
•  ginkgo tree - The ginkgo tree, also known as the maidenhair tree, is a completely unique tree in the world today. It has no known close relatives.
•  lamented - expressed sorrow or regret for
•  gourmet - an expert in fine food and drink
•  assembled throng - a large group of people gathered closely together
•  finest culinary establishment - an excellent restaurant
•  dialogue - a conversation between two or more people

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  What advice do Eva's neighbors give her?
•  Did nothing really happen on 90th Street?
•  What kind of stories do you like to write about?
•  What title would your neighborhood story be?

Craft ideas:
•  Draw a book cover of your neighborhood & write a short story of fun things that might happen there.
•  Make a menu with pictures of dishes you would have in a new restaurant.
•  Make a cityscape collage. Cut out buildings, windows, houses, cars, trees, etc. Arrange and paste these onto a sheet of paper.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!