Tales for Very Picky Eaters



Last updated Friday, July 13, 2012

Author: Josh Schneider
Illustrator: Josh Schneider
Date of Publication: 2011
ISBN: 0547149565
Grade Level: 1st    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Jul. 2012

Synopsis: James is a very picky eater. His dad has to get creative—very creative—in order to get James to eat foods he thinks he doesn’t like. He presents James with a series of outlandish scenarios packed with fanciful and gross kid-friendly details—like pre-chewed gum as an alternative to broccoli and lumpy oatmeal that grows so big it eats the dog—in an effort to get James to eat. But it is eventually James himself who discovers that some foods are not so bad, after all, if you’re willing to give them a try.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  What does it mean to be a "picky eater?"
•  Are you a picky eater?
•  What is your favorite food? Least favorite food?
•  Do your parents make you eat your food even if you don't like it? Or will they make you something different?
•  Do you like to try out new foods?
•  What kinds of food do you eat for breakfast/lunch/dinner at home?

Vocabulary
•  Imported: to bring in from a foreign country for use or sale
•  Perfecting: accurate, exact, or correct in every detail
•  Repulsive: disgusting
•  Disgusting: offensive to the physical, moral, or aesthetic taste
•  Scrunch: to crunch, crush, or crumple
•  Lumpy: full of lumps
•  Appetite: desire for food and water; hungry
•  Prodded:to poke or jab with or as if with something pointed:
•  Wailed: to lament or mourn bitterly.

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  Do you think James' father really wanted James to eat dirt and dirty socks?
•  Do you think there's a troll living in James' basement?
•  Why do you think James' father makes up stories?
•  Why is it important to eat healthy things?
•  Was there ever anything you thought you didn't like, but tried it anyway? Did you still not like it or was it okay?

Craft ideas:
•  Food Pyramid: Cut a piece of construction paper into a triangle. On one side, make a collage pyramid for picky eaters. On the other, make the real food pyramid with paper cutouts of healthy foods.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!