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Polar Bear Night



Last updated Wednesday, July 5, 2006

Author: Lauren Thompson and Stephen Savage
Date of Publication:
ISBN: 0439495245
Grade Level: 1st    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Jul. 2006

Synopsis: (from the publisher) A little polar bear cub wakes on a still, Arctic night. She walks out to explore her snowy world. What will happen on this special winter night? Suddenly, the stars stir in the sky, and soon, they begin to fall like snowflakes. It is a star shower. Soothing words and luminous pictures show how an Arctic night can be just as cozy as a warm bed at home.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Where do polar bears live? Find the North Pole on the map.
•  Have you ever seen a polar bear at the zoo?
•  What other animals live at the North Pole? What do you think the North Pole looks like?
•  Do you ever feel restless before you go to sleep? What do you do?
•  N.B. Penguins live at the South Pole, not the North Pole.
•  What animals live at both poles? (seals, whales, walruses)

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  Where does Polar Bear live? What is her house like?
•  Fun facts: Polar bears are the largest of all the bears; they can swim up to 100 miles; humans are their only enemies; they only live in the Arctic, not the South Pole.
•  What animals does Polar Bear see on her journey? [You might talk about mammals, and discuss the fact that all of these are mammals.]
•  Have you ever seen a ?shooting star?? What is a shooting star? [meteor]

Craft ideas:
•  Bring ahead option: paper plates and yarn. Make masks of any of the animals they read about.
•  Draw a picture of the night sky Polar Bear sees. Or cut out shapes to glue onto construction paper to make a collage of the night sky.
•  Draw a picture of Polar Bear or the other animals.

Special activities:
•  Try walking like a polar bear. Have a parade where each student walks like an Arctic animal.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!