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Peter Pan and Wendy



Last updated Wednesday, June 29, 2005

Author: J.M. Barrie
Illustrator: Robert R. Ingpen
Date of Publication: 2004
ISBN: 0439672570
Grade Level: 5th    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Jul. 2005

Synopsis: This classic tale of the boy who wouldn't grow up, his earthly friends, and their adventures in Neverland is a popular subject for illustrators.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  How many of you know this story?
•  What is growing up like? What is good and bad about growing up?
•  How many of you would like to be able to fly?

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  (starting on page 36 - see note under Special Challenge)
•  What was Peter Pan looking for and why?
•  Why was Tinker Bell jealous of Wendy?
•  What made the children fly? What did they think made them able to fly?
•  If you did not know what a kiss was, what would you guess it to be?
•  Describe Peter Pan. How is he different than Wendy?
•  Where is Peter Pan taking Wendy and her brothers?

Craft ideas:
•  With string and construction paper, make yourself an eye patch. Decorate it. (Bring ahead option: string, felt, glitter glue, feathers, etc.)
•  Make a paper alligator and write a fun note to a friend.
•  Pretend to be Wendy and write a letter to your parents explaining your disappearance.

Special activities:
•  The beginning of the story is difficult so please consider beginning the reading on page 36 when Peter Pan appears in Wendy's room. You might want to show the students the pictures throughout the book since you won't be able to read all of it in order to spark their interest in reading it later.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!