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My Friend Rabbit



Last updated Monday, January 24, 2005

Author: Eric Rohmann
Illustrator: Eric Rohmann
Date of Publication: 2003
ISBN: 0761315357
Grade Level: Kindergarten    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Feb. 2005

Synopsis: (from the publisher) When Mouse lets his best friend, Rabbit, play with his brand-new airplane, trouble isn't far behind. Of course, Rabbit has a solution -- but when Rabbit sets out to solve a problem, even bigger problems follow.

Every child who's ever had someone slightly bigger or slightly older over to play will recognize this story about toys and trouble and friendship. Eric Rohmann's third picture book is illustrated with robust, wonderfully expressive hand-colored relief prints -- the perfect vehicle for a simple, heartfelt tale about childhood.

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Do a picture walk with the book. What do you think the story is about? What do you think the characters' names are? What colors do you see on each page? How many teeth on the alligator?
•  What kinds of things do you do with your friends? Ever get in trouble together? Ever help eachother out?

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  What trouble does Rabbit have in the beginning of the story? What animals helped him?
•  What other activities do you think Rabbit and Mouse do?
•  What is another way they could have gotten the plane down? What do you think Rabbit's idea is at the end of the book?

Craft ideas:
•  Make a paper airplane, and decorate with pictures from the book, or with pictures of animals.
•  Make a headband on a stip of paper with pictures of all of the animals from the book. Add rabbit ears to make it complete.

Special activities:
•  Sing Old McDonald using the animals from the book.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!