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Tubby the Tuba



Last updated Monday, March 5, 2012

Author: Paul Tripp
Illustrator: Henry Cole
Date of Publication: 2006
ISBN: 0525477179
Grade Level: Kindergarten    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Mar. 2012

Synopsis: For sixty years audiences have been charmed by the adventures of a tuba named Tubby. All day long, Tubby plays oompah, oompah with his orchestra, but what he really wants is to "dance with the pretty little tune." A resourceful bullfrog shows Tubby that everyone has the right to play his own melody.

Note to readers:
•  When an instrument speaks, point out the instrument on the page

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Have you ever played an instrument?
•  Is there a difference between fiddles and violins? (No, the difference is the kind of music played)

Vocabulary:
•  Snickered: Partial laugh
•  Tuning Up: Playing then adjusting musical instruments to be in tune
•  Indignation: Anger or annoyance
•  Orchestra: A large ensemble of instruments, included string, brass, woodwind, and percussion
•  Rehearsal: Practice
•  Celeste (pronounced “Chellest”)
•  Pizzicaro (pronounced “Pitz-ee-caro”)

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  Why was everyone mad at Tubby?
•  Do you have a special talent? Have you showed it to anyone? Do people like it?

Craft ideas:
•  Create a bass drum:
-Cut one piece of construction paper in half
-Using rubber bands, wrap one piece of the construction paper around one end of a 4x3 cardboard cylinder (GLCs: request these from the R2K office), and the other piece around the other end of the cylinder.
-Have students decorate the sides of the drums and the construction paper

Special activities:
•  Play leap frog or play "oompah," "oompah," tuba (like duck, duck, goose)

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!