Volunteers needed in October!   Click here to sign up.
 Site Areas: 
  HOME  
  ABOUT US  
  FRIENDS & SUPPORTERS  
  HOW TO HELP  
  NEWS  
  READING CLUBS  
Printer-friendly version   

The Pumpkin Goblin Makes Friends



Last updated Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Author: Aaron Taylor
Illustrator: Gary Whitley
Date of Publication: 2008
ISBN: 1934572004
Grade Level: 2nd    (GLCs: Click here for grade level guidelines.)
Date(s) Used: Oct. 2009

Synopsis: The Pumpkin Goblin Makes Friends is a wonderfully illustrated story about a mean-spirited Pumpkin Goblin who learns to make friends with the help of the town hero, a boy named Fred. Discover the story of the Pumpkin Goblin and turn this Halloween into a fun filled experience! From Barnes and Noble

Note to readers:
•  Vocabulary: bog, muck, scamper, mob, amend

Discussion topics for before reading:
•  Do you know what a goblin is?
•  Who will the pumpkin goblin make friends with?
•  What makes a good friend?
•  Do you know what a Scarecrow is? Do you see one on the cover?
•  How many pumpkins do you see on the cover? On both the front and back cover?

Discussion topics for during/after reading:
•  What does the pumpkin goblin do on Halloween night?
•  Did the pumpkin goblin have any friends?
•  Who does the pumpkin goblin make friends with?
•  What do the townspeople think about his plan to make friends? What do they want to do?
•  What happens when they get to the bog?
•  What does the pumpkin goblin do on Halloween nights now?
•  Do you think the pumpkin goblin is a good friend now? Why?
•  Are you scared of anything? What?
•  Do you know what a bog is?
•  Have you ever been scared on Halloween?
•  What are you going to be on Halloween?

Craft ideas:
•  Make a pumpkin mask. Check craft box for any paper plates.
•  Draw what you are going to be for Halloween.
•  Make your own Green Muck Worm Stew and paste it on a construction paper shoe. Use yarn or construction paper for worms. See illustration on the last page of book.

*Note: These craft ideas are just suggestions. You can use them, but you don’t have to use them. You can expand upon them, or add your own twist. Remember, though, that the focus of your time should not be on the development and execution of a craft; the focus should be on the read-aloud and the enjoyment of the book!